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As we all know, there’s the fantasy of Giverny…

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…and then there’s the reality:

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New Yorker magazine cover of June 5, 2000 by the great illustrator Ian Falconer.

 From April to October Monet’s garden at Giverny is open seven days a week and half a million “culture tourists” make the pilgrimage to this tiny village to see the famous Japanese bridge:

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When I was there last month the wisteria on what is called the “superstructure” of the bridge was just starting to bloom…

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…but the famous water lilies don’t blossom until late July. Since except for bullfrogs calling to each other there was nothing of interest going on in the water, I spent my time watching people take in The Most Famous Japanese Bridge in France:

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And then I went exploring in Giverny. I took a walk down the main drag of the village (pop. 505) called, of course, Rue Claude Monet. At the far end of the long wall that keeps Monet’s houses secluded on Rue Claude Monet there is a big green door…

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…which is Monet’s old garage door, where he used to pull in his Panhard Lavassor that he bought in 1900. I know! I can’t picture Monet driving a car either!   As you continue your mosey thorugh the village on the Rue Claude Monet you pass picturesque houses…P1160440

…and the tourist information center and the Impressionist Museum of Giverny  that used to be called The Museum of American Art in honor of all the Americans who flocked to this village to paint with the Master from 1880 – 1926:

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Nice restaurant, very nice gardens, bijoux collection.

And then you get to the main hub of social life in Giverny the Baudy Hotel…

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…where all Monet’s American acolytes used to hang out in olden times and where they are still doing a bang-up business serving lunch and diner and tea.

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In the Petit Galerie Baudy, right there at the Baudy Hotel, there is a storefront where Monsieur Frederic Desessard works, a miniaturist after my own heart:

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He very kindly let me photograph him painting his latest tableaux (he does not usually allow photographs of him at work):

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And he then showed me how he paints with a toothpick:

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Here he’s putting the finishing touches on his copy of one of the rare Monet paintings of his flower garden ( if you want to see the original it’s in the Musee d’Orsay in Paris) and has finished one of the 18 similar views of the Japanese bridge that Monet painted between 1899 and 1900 (see: the top of this post). The portrait of Camille Monet  that M. Desessard has beautifully reproduced is in the National Gallery in Washington D.C.

I asked to buy one of these miniatures but M. Desessard told me that he doesn’t sell his paintings, he uses them for the tiny 3D tableaux he makes and sells in his shop.

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Photo by Jean-Michel Peers — to see more follow the link below — read on!

Hmmmmm…I think I just got my inspiration for my Giverny Triscuit...

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You can find the finished Triscuit at the end of this post.

Anyhoo, If you are going to Giverny, you can’t miss M. Desessard…

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Photo by Jean-Michel Peers.

…right on the main drag, at 81 Rue Claude Monet. The French photographer Jean-Michel Peers has graciously permitted me to show you his photos of M. Desessard at work on his miniatures — click onto this link here to see more, and to check out Jean-Michel’s portfolio of wonderful historical photos of Giverny and of Monet’s garden too.

But we, you and me, dear readers, have not finished out our wanderings there. We are going to go further down Rue Claude Monet to the 15th century church of Sainte Radegonde

P1160765…to pay respects to the seven WWII British airmen who are fondly remembered by the people of Giverny; their Lancaster bomber crashed nearby in 1944 and the village honors them with this grave:

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British visitors to Giverny leave English coins here.

We will take a walk around the churchyard to the side area where we’ll will find the beautiful grave of Gerald Van der Kemp, the man responsible for restoring Monet’s gardens:

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Mr. Van der Kemp lies next to the Monet family grave, the resting place of the Master himself (along with various family members):

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Few of the day trippers who come to Giverny bother to make the walk up to Eglise Sainte Radegonde…and it’s not even “off the beaten track”! To really get Off The Beaten Track, you have two choices. You can get out of town on the D5:

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Yes, we are going to walk 4 km to Vernon!

In which case you will walk along the banks of the River Epte…

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…on the path takes you past the secluded studio where the American artist (and Monet’s next door neighbor in Giverny)  Frederick Carl Frieseke got the privacy he needed to paint his favorite subject, naked ladies sunbathing. The house used to be home to a community of monks who bred fish to stock the local rivers…

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…but do not go fishing in the Epte or the Ru unless you’ve paid your 89 euro license fee :

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This is the Epte, which flows into the Seine. The River Ru is a branch of the Epte and it’s the Ru that flows into Monet’s pond in his water garden.

That red signposted on that tree announces that this area is under the control of the Fédération de l’Eure pour la Pêche et la Protection du Milieu Aquatique. You can look them up. France has strict fishing protections on all its streams, brooks, creeks, and rivers.

Other sights along the D5:

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Does anyone know what this is? Monique — can you explain your people’s strange foreign ways?

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And that’s how you get to Vernon as the lone pedestrian on the D5.

Your other choice of getting Off The Beaten Path is to take Rue Claude Monet alllllllllll the way to the end of town…

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…and find the bike path….

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…that is easier to walk on than the D5 and “busier” (this is where all those people who rent bikes at the Vernon train station go, but it’s still pretty deserted) and nearly quite as scenic…

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…and when you get to Vernon on this route…

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…there is this:

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The sign says: Attention au chat. You don’t see the chat? He’s there! He’s right there:

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Now, if you really want to get Off The Beaten Track in Giverny…

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…all you have to do is take the foot path that starts where the Rue du Chateau d’Eau ends and climb…

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…until you find the perfect picnic spot…

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Looks like a Plebicula dorylas to me. My guide to French butterflies calls this color “sky blue”. I thought it was a wildflower at first, then I saw it was an elegant French insect.

…where you can sit and plan your next visit to Giverny (maybe walk that highway  all the way to Sainte-Genevieve-les-Gasny?):

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I thought I would be finished with Giverny with this post, having told as many stories about my visit as my dear readers have the patience for…but no, I have one more piece of business. I have a Giverny Triscuit to give away!

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Seeing M. Desessard’s copies of famous Monet paintings gave me the urge to do something I’ve never done before: COPY. So here it is, My Monet:

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And that’s why we call it a Triscuit.

If you would like to give a home to this original watercolor Giverny Triscuit, please leave a Comment below before the Comments close on midnight June 26 and, as usual, Top Cat will pick a winner totally at random, to be announced when we all get together again next Friday.

This was fun, copying one of the most iconographic works of art of the 20th century. I think I’d like to do it again. Anybody got any suggestions for another Masterpiece Triscuit???

56 comments to Giverny’s Back Roads

  • I was feeling kind of bad moodish tonight until I visited with you and Monet! thank you!
    We visited the gardens with a tour group – one of the perks of a tour group is admission paid without standing in lines and not having to worry about parking or driving and getting lost. One of the draw backs is that we didn’t get to walk in the village, so now I feel as though I have!
    I bought a copy of the bridge painting from a high school girl — and I inserted photos of my 2 grand daughters (8 and 6) on the bridge – they love reading Linea in MOnet’s Garden – so I put THEM there ;-)

  • I love your guidance through Giverny. I’ve dreamt about visiting and your images have helped me travel. Thanks!

  • Nicole

    Thank you so much for this! My husband saw the picture of the young man standing in front of the green door, and exclaimed, “We’ve been there!” I had to disappoint him, because we haven’t made it to this magical place yet. Your paintings are so beautiful, your posts so engaging, that I want to travel right now. I am really looking forward to the next book.

  • Janine Huisjen

    But of course you were on the beaten path. Otherwise you wouldn’t have been able to see it. Those paths are special, though–only for wanderers who tread lightly to see something lovely. The best kind! I am so enjoying my trek around France with you as I know I will never go there. I’d like to see you do a Van Gogh, too–but maybe one of his paintings of fields or orchards in daylight rather than a nighttime painting. I’m looking forward to my triscuit…

  • Linda Ashmore

    Oh, pick me, pick me! As a great admirer of your blogs and your art, I would treasure it! Looking at your photos, and knowing that the French drive on the “American” side of the road, I had a great urge to take a road trip over there. My husband and I did that together once, and it was great fun!

  • Carol

    I hope Top Cat picks the number of this post!! And if you are doing another Triscuit masterpiece could we PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE have one of au chat???? Not just any chat, but one of your staff. Thanks for being so good to your readers!! Happy Summer!

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