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We all know about the crappy painting I did last time we were together (see: following post).

Well, I painted another version of the Loire Valley September sunset:

I’ve stopped here, even thought the picture is not finished, and even though it looks awfully fairy-tale-ish This is as far as I’m going with this picture for the time being because I’m not sure what to do with this next — getting this far was a fluke of dipping the paint brush in the right amount of water and paint and getting a happy accident.

And, then, I turned my painting up-side-down:

And damned if I don’t kind of like this, too; see some possibilities in working the illustration from this side up.

And as far as I know, examining their work up-side-down for possibilities is something  that writers  don’t have to contend with.

Sometimes, I wish that all I did was write words, but dear lord: what kid of blog would that make?

10 comments to I’m Pretty Sure That the Loire Valley is for Real.

  • I’ve gotten that very feeling with collages and now I get it all the time with my new addiction…zentangles. I think you might scoff but seriously it’s the most fun, relaxing, and whatever the name for “that feeling” is. Maybe you’ll think its stupid but I can’t stop doing them. See some on my blog and then look up the official site on google, if I have gotten you curious. I’ll write to you more about it later.

  • P.S. I like the upside-down Azay-Le-Rideau painting.
    That’s my sister with the gray hair in the avatar.
    We have a blog together but now this picture is appearing on my comments. Don’t know why.

  • Nadine

    If you’re stuck on a verbal problem, turn it upside down by doing something non-verbal. Don’t know how put something into words? Dance. Go outside and prune the garden. Listen to Carmena Berana from the beginning. (I recommend the San Francisco Orchestra’s version.)

    If you’re stuck on a non-verbal problem like painting, do something verbal. Read a novel by P. G. Wodehouse. Write a letter. Watch a French movie with English subtitles. (I recommend “Le Divorce” because Thierry Lhermitte is in it.)

    Didn’t some Greek coin the work Eureka when he had an inspiration about something in the bath? Isaac Newton saw an apple fall and connected it to gravity. You solved your narrative’s riddle by getting out of the house.

    Change is good. It’s how we get our right-brain to communicate with our left-brain. NOW you’re using your whole brain and viola! Inspiration.

  • I would comment on the other stuff but I’m too busy laughing about this: “Good Lord…we are one homely-ass barely-bi-pedal fat-ass species.” Ah. Thanks. I needed that.

  • Deborah

    I once tried to have a writer vs painter conversation with a co-worker: he did watercolors; I wrote. I tried to describe to him that ah-ha, seeing-the-work-as-a-whole epiphany experience & asked him if that was the way he experienced painting. It was clear he didn’t know what the hell I was talking about, not even a little, so I let it drop and never broached the subject with anyone ever again. I feel so vindicated now.

  • As far as the either/or of painting and writing, both are creative pursuits and I don’t think I’d want to choose between them. Sometimes you feel like a nut. Sometimes you don’t.

  • Helen McHargue

    I wrote a poem once that was “dictated” to me from somewhere. It just came out. Never wrote poetry in my life. I keep waiting for it to happen again because I thought some creative plug had popped open and a flow would go. No such luck.

  • Shelley

    I used to get that poetry dictation thing too, like Helen. When I was in high school, phrases would just pop into my mind, and the whole poem would follow. It was wonderful and exciting whenever it happened.

    I too wish the creative flow would begin again…don’t know if all my years of left brain accounting and Excel spreadsheets are blocking the muse or what. I miss it, and keep hoping for a re-connection!

  • good advice, Nadine. I don’t have a thing to say. I am neither artsy or writey. You gals GO for it, tho…..I love Vivian’s blog.

  • As an artist, watercolourist, quilter, etc. I have to say that you are trying to hard as a painter. If it is that difficult for you to communicate with the universe, um, go about it in another way. Relax. I’ve never had to paint something over and over again to get it right. Actually, whenever I pick up my brush and look at my paper, the universe opens up for me immediately.

    But then again, I suck at writing. Just saying.

    :)

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